What You Must Know Before Referring a Videographer

Whether you’re a professional in the special event industry or simply a friend referring a videographer to another friend,  your vendor referrals carry a lot of weight. They also reflect back on you as the source of the referral. You want to be sure they’re solid and for the right reasons. If you’ve been involved with events at all, whether you work onsite or behind the scenes during the event you know the demands of overseeing its minute-to-minute success, and you may also know the distraction of having to babysit a vendor who isn’t able to keep up with the program. Here are a few tips to smooth out any possible bumps in the road.

Marc Gold with video cameraYour class “A” referral is a resourceful problem solver. He’s brings with him the experience of having been through and resolved all the challenges already. Experience counts! No one wants to or has the time to be burdened by a vendor who needs to be constantly supervised.  In the case of the videographer, a few simple steps taken to create a cooperative working relationship with the other onsite professionals can ensure a gratifying experience not only for the clients and guests, but especially for the coordinator who has many other responsibilities to balance.

From the videographer’s perspective, it’s as simple as taking the initiative to build a bit of rapport with the DJ and the photographer early in the event at a time when successful working relationships can be built, quickly, discretely and behind the scenes.

The insightful videographer knows from experience that he is going to have to focus on the DJ’s announcements to keep on track with the program without having to be reminded. He will have sought out the photographer to work out a choreography with him that allows both to complete their work in sync, working side by side. Positioning for the toast and cake-cutting are two good cases in point that bring both professionals in very close proximity. Smoothing out the path ahead is part of the experience and personality of the seasoned videographer that makes him/her a valuable asset on your preferred vendor list. It’s all about knowing which steps to take ahead of time to ensure that issues that could create friction are foreseen and addressed before they can become visible problems. It’s a level well above “just getting the job done.” It’s about ensuring that it gets done well.

Everyone needs to work cooperatively to accomplish their respective jobs with minimum supervision, and without interrupting the event flow.

Make certain you choose a videographer with the experience and professional approach that helps you succeed. The rewards are great in terms of a client’s gratitude, return business, social media sharing and shining reviews.

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Amateur Videos Can Work Against You

 

There’s a time and a place for amateur video, and it’s never the right time to put one on your business website.

My actor/friend, Kevin, with whom I’ve collaborated many times as the on-camera host of several corporate video productions, went to work for a software company whose website offered some video of their product. Unfortunately the site had a very high bounce rate driving nearly everyone away from the site without doing business with the company leaving Kevin and the rest of the sales force without many prospects.

It was no mystery.  Just about everything that could be technically wrong with their promotional videos was wrong:  Poor audio, participants recorded in front of a very bright open window with blinds drawn halfway down and hanging crooked, poorly prepared and not very well dressed employees fumbling to speak on camera. This was the video the company put in front of their prospective customers that was supposed to capture their interest and persuade them to purchase the software. There was an obvious disconnect here:  A high-end software product marketed to a technically astute audience promoted with a homemade video.

Kevin, distraught,  implored me to write a proposal for a new promotional video for his company which I willingly did. The company never responded and is still floundering to this day.

What it boils down to is this:  Resist the temptation to pick up your mobile device to record your latest news flash. It’s all about “image” and the impression you want to associate with your “brand”, which, in the broad sense of the word,  is much more than just your logo. It’s the whole user experience associated with your business, including, and especially, your website video. Websites are compromised, reputations tarnished and customers discouraged by amateur videos on the site. The bar is high today for website video with the expectation that it should be picture and audio perfect. Vis a vis professional video, homemade video just looks very amateurish, and on an otherwise carefully developed website is enough to damage your credibility sending the whole purchasing process into a fatal tailspin. It certainly doesn’t add to a website the level of credibility that’s needed to build consumer trust.

With a credible video, one that shows professionalism in the making, you have the potential to build a strong connection with visitors that helps them feel comfortable doing business with you. Amateur videos can definitely undo that critical process.

Please check out our video series, “Why Businesses Need Video” and the article: “How Good is Video on My Website.”

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